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Everything You Need to Know About Flour Slideshow

Everything You Need to Know About Flour Slideshow


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All-purpose flour is made from a combination of soft winter wheat and hard winter wheat, making it an optimal choice for all kinds of baking. One thing to consider, though, when using all-purpose is whether you want to use bleached or unbleached. Some bakers don’t notice a discernible difference in their finished baked goods, while others claim that bleached flour results in better volume, tenderness, and even flavor. One common misperception is that because bleached flour is whiter, it is somehow purer. Since such chemicals as benzoyl peroxide and chlorine gas are used to bleach it, though, "pure" might not be the word. (Potassium bromate and/or ascorbic acid are also sometimes added to counteract the gluten-weakening properties of chlorine gas.) Additives can change the level of flour proteins, which is why some folks say they yield tenderer baked goods. These chemicals are not thought to be a health risk, although some will argue this point. While all these things are important to consider, a good tip is to use whichever kind of flour is called for in a particular recipe.

Bleached vs. Unbleached

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All-purpose flour is made from a combination of soft winter wheat and hard winter wheat, making it an optimal choice for all kinds of baking. While all these things are important to consider, a good tip is to use whichever kind of flour is called for in a particular recipe.

Bleached vs. Unbleached, Continued

A great choice for bleached flours is Gold Medal All-Purpose. Used by many recipe developers, it contains around 10.5 percent protein, and is a great choice for popular baked goods like cakes, cookies, brownies, and pie crusts. For unbleached, we like King Arthur. It has 11.7 percent protein content and can be used for everything from cakes and cookies to piecrusts and pizza dough. They also offer an organic version that contains 11.8 percent protein.

Bread Flours

Bread flour is preferred for yeast breads, pizza dough, rolls, and focaccia. It has a higher protein count than other flours, making it preferable when working with yeast. This is because yeast produces carbon dioxide gas that helps bread rise, but it is also gives the bread the structural support from gluten to hold its volume. King Arthur Unbleached Bread Flour with 12.7 percent protein is a good choice for bread flour.

High-Gluten Flour

High-gluten flour is like super-charged bread flour, so it’s also very good for yeast baking. Because it has a much higher level of protein, at 14.2 percent, it’s perfect for making extra-chewy baked goods like bagels or artisan-style breads.

Cake Flour

Cake flour is typically bleached, although unbleached versions can be found. It has the lowest protein content, therefore making it appropriate for light and fluffy baked goods such as cakes, muffins, and biscuits.

Pastry Flour

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This is a middle-ground flour with a protein content that usually falls between those of cake flour and all-purpose flour. Many bakers like it for piecrust. You can simulate it yourself by combining all-purpose and cake flours in equal quantities.


Chickpea flour: Everything you need to know

Chickpea flour is mildly nutty, earthy and gluten-free. Photo: Richard Cornish

Chickpea flour is what it says on the pack: flour made from white chickpeas. It is coarser than Indian chickpea flour, called besan or gram flour, gram being Bengali for chickpea.

Why do we love it?

Mildly nutty, earthy and extremely nutritious, chickpea flour has come to the rescue of Western cooks and chefs looking for a gluten-free alternative to wheat-based flour.

High in fibre and antioxidants and with twice the protein of wheat flour, it is handy for binding, thickening and adding bulk to dishes.

Who uses it?

Charmaine O'Brien, author of The Penguin Food Guide to India, says chickpea flour is essential to many Indian dishes, from deep-fried pakoras, a type of vegetable fritter, to the very sweet and fragrant halwa, a fudgy dessert.

The Woollahra-based author, who has lived in India on and off for more than 20 years, uses the flour with a little salt and crushed cardamom seeds to make a batter in which she deep-fries sardine fillets or spinach leaves as snacks to serve with drinks.

A favourite use is to make a batter made with chickpea flour and enough water to create a consistency of pouring cream. She runs this though a sieve and then into hot oil where it's fried and served as a crunchy snack (boondi).


Chickpea flour: Everything you need to know

Chickpea flour is mildly nutty, earthy and gluten-free. Photo: Richard Cornish

Chickpea flour is what it says on the pack: flour made from white chickpeas. It is coarser than Indian chickpea flour, called besan or gram flour, gram being Bengali for chickpea.

Why do we love it?

Mildly nutty, earthy and extremely nutritious, chickpea flour has come to the rescue of Western cooks and chefs looking for a gluten-free alternative to wheat-based flour.

High in fibre and antioxidants and with twice the protein of wheat flour, it is handy for binding, thickening and adding bulk to dishes.

Who uses it?

Charmaine O'Brien, author of The Penguin Food Guide to India, says chickpea flour is essential to many Indian dishes, from deep-fried pakoras, a type of vegetable fritter, to the very sweet and fragrant halwa, a fudgy dessert.

The Woollahra-based author, who has lived in India on and off for more than 20 years, uses the flour with a little salt and crushed cardamom seeds to make a batter in which she deep-fries sardine fillets or spinach leaves as snacks to serve with drinks.

A favourite use is to make a batter made with chickpea flour and enough water to create a consistency of pouring cream. She runs this though a sieve and then into hot oil where it's fried and served as a crunchy snack (boondi).


Chickpea flour: Everything you need to know

Chickpea flour is mildly nutty, earthy and gluten-free. Photo: Richard Cornish

Chickpea flour is what it says on the pack: flour made from white chickpeas. It is coarser than Indian chickpea flour, called besan or gram flour, gram being Bengali for chickpea.

Why do we love it?

Mildly nutty, earthy and extremely nutritious, chickpea flour has come to the rescue of Western cooks and chefs looking for a gluten-free alternative to wheat-based flour.

High in fibre and antioxidants and with twice the protein of wheat flour, it is handy for binding, thickening and adding bulk to dishes.

Who uses it?

Charmaine O'Brien, author of The Penguin Food Guide to India, says chickpea flour is essential to many Indian dishes, from deep-fried pakoras, a type of vegetable fritter, to the very sweet and fragrant halwa, a fudgy dessert.

The Woollahra-based author, who has lived in India on and off for more than 20 years, uses the flour with a little salt and crushed cardamom seeds to make a batter in which she deep-fries sardine fillets or spinach leaves as snacks to serve with drinks.

A favourite use is to make a batter made with chickpea flour and enough water to create a consistency of pouring cream. She runs this though a sieve and then into hot oil where it's fried and served as a crunchy snack (boondi).


Chickpea flour: Everything you need to know

Chickpea flour is mildly nutty, earthy and gluten-free. Photo: Richard Cornish

Chickpea flour is what it says on the pack: flour made from white chickpeas. It is coarser than Indian chickpea flour, called besan or gram flour, gram being Bengali for chickpea.

Why do we love it?

Mildly nutty, earthy and extremely nutritious, chickpea flour has come to the rescue of Western cooks and chefs looking for a gluten-free alternative to wheat-based flour.

High in fibre and antioxidants and with twice the protein of wheat flour, it is handy for binding, thickening and adding bulk to dishes.

Who uses it?

Charmaine O'Brien, author of The Penguin Food Guide to India, says chickpea flour is essential to many Indian dishes, from deep-fried pakoras, a type of vegetable fritter, to the very sweet and fragrant halwa, a fudgy dessert.

The Woollahra-based author, who has lived in India on and off for more than 20 years, uses the flour with a little salt and crushed cardamom seeds to make a batter in which she deep-fries sardine fillets or spinach leaves as snacks to serve with drinks.

A favourite use is to make a batter made with chickpea flour and enough water to create a consistency of pouring cream. She runs this though a sieve and then into hot oil where it's fried and served as a crunchy snack (boondi).


Chickpea flour: Everything you need to know

Chickpea flour is mildly nutty, earthy and gluten-free. Photo: Richard Cornish

Chickpea flour is what it says on the pack: flour made from white chickpeas. It is coarser than Indian chickpea flour, called besan or gram flour, gram being Bengali for chickpea.

Why do we love it?

Mildly nutty, earthy and extremely nutritious, chickpea flour has come to the rescue of Western cooks and chefs looking for a gluten-free alternative to wheat-based flour.

High in fibre and antioxidants and with twice the protein of wheat flour, it is handy for binding, thickening and adding bulk to dishes.

Who uses it?

Charmaine O'Brien, author of The Penguin Food Guide to India, says chickpea flour is essential to many Indian dishes, from deep-fried pakoras, a type of vegetable fritter, to the very sweet and fragrant halwa, a fudgy dessert.

The Woollahra-based author, who has lived in India on and off for more than 20 years, uses the flour with a little salt and crushed cardamom seeds to make a batter in which she deep-fries sardine fillets or spinach leaves as snacks to serve with drinks.

A favourite use is to make a batter made with chickpea flour and enough water to create a consistency of pouring cream. She runs this though a sieve and then into hot oil where it's fried and served as a crunchy snack (boondi).


Chickpea flour: Everything you need to know

Chickpea flour is mildly nutty, earthy and gluten-free. Photo: Richard Cornish

Chickpea flour is what it says on the pack: flour made from white chickpeas. It is coarser than Indian chickpea flour, called besan or gram flour, gram being Bengali for chickpea.

Why do we love it?

Mildly nutty, earthy and extremely nutritious, chickpea flour has come to the rescue of Western cooks and chefs looking for a gluten-free alternative to wheat-based flour.

High in fibre and antioxidants and with twice the protein of wheat flour, it is handy for binding, thickening and adding bulk to dishes.

Who uses it?

Charmaine O'Brien, author of The Penguin Food Guide to India, says chickpea flour is essential to many Indian dishes, from deep-fried pakoras, a type of vegetable fritter, to the very sweet and fragrant halwa, a fudgy dessert.

The Woollahra-based author, who has lived in India on and off for more than 20 years, uses the flour with a little salt and crushed cardamom seeds to make a batter in which she deep-fries sardine fillets or spinach leaves as snacks to serve with drinks.

A favourite use is to make a batter made with chickpea flour and enough water to create a consistency of pouring cream. She runs this though a sieve and then into hot oil where it's fried and served as a crunchy snack (boondi).


Chickpea flour: Everything you need to know

Chickpea flour is mildly nutty, earthy and gluten-free. Photo: Richard Cornish

Chickpea flour is what it says on the pack: flour made from white chickpeas. It is coarser than Indian chickpea flour, called besan or gram flour, gram being Bengali for chickpea.

Why do we love it?

Mildly nutty, earthy and extremely nutritious, chickpea flour has come to the rescue of Western cooks and chefs looking for a gluten-free alternative to wheat-based flour.

High in fibre and antioxidants and with twice the protein of wheat flour, it is handy for binding, thickening and adding bulk to dishes.

Who uses it?

Charmaine O'Brien, author of The Penguin Food Guide to India, says chickpea flour is essential to many Indian dishes, from deep-fried pakoras, a type of vegetable fritter, to the very sweet and fragrant halwa, a fudgy dessert.

The Woollahra-based author, who has lived in India on and off for more than 20 years, uses the flour with a little salt and crushed cardamom seeds to make a batter in which she deep-fries sardine fillets or spinach leaves as snacks to serve with drinks.

A favourite use is to make a batter made with chickpea flour and enough water to create a consistency of pouring cream. She runs this though a sieve and then into hot oil where it's fried and served as a crunchy snack (boondi).


Chickpea flour: Everything you need to know

Chickpea flour is mildly nutty, earthy and gluten-free. Photo: Richard Cornish

Chickpea flour is what it says on the pack: flour made from white chickpeas. It is coarser than Indian chickpea flour, called besan or gram flour, gram being Bengali for chickpea.

Why do we love it?

Mildly nutty, earthy and extremely nutritious, chickpea flour has come to the rescue of Western cooks and chefs looking for a gluten-free alternative to wheat-based flour.

High in fibre and antioxidants and with twice the protein of wheat flour, it is handy for binding, thickening and adding bulk to dishes.

Who uses it?

Charmaine O'Brien, author of The Penguin Food Guide to India, says chickpea flour is essential to many Indian dishes, from deep-fried pakoras, a type of vegetable fritter, to the very sweet and fragrant halwa, a fudgy dessert.

The Woollahra-based author, who has lived in India on and off for more than 20 years, uses the flour with a little salt and crushed cardamom seeds to make a batter in which she deep-fries sardine fillets or spinach leaves as snacks to serve with drinks.

A favourite use is to make a batter made with chickpea flour and enough water to create a consistency of pouring cream. She runs this though a sieve and then into hot oil where it's fried and served as a crunchy snack (boondi).


Chickpea flour: Everything you need to know

Chickpea flour is mildly nutty, earthy and gluten-free. Photo: Richard Cornish

Chickpea flour is what it says on the pack: flour made from white chickpeas. It is coarser than Indian chickpea flour, called besan or gram flour, gram being Bengali for chickpea.

Why do we love it?

Mildly nutty, earthy and extremely nutritious, chickpea flour has come to the rescue of Western cooks and chefs looking for a gluten-free alternative to wheat-based flour.

High in fibre and antioxidants and with twice the protein of wheat flour, it is handy for binding, thickening and adding bulk to dishes.

Who uses it?

Charmaine O'Brien, author of The Penguin Food Guide to India, says chickpea flour is essential to many Indian dishes, from deep-fried pakoras, a type of vegetable fritter, to the very sweet and fragrant halwa, a fudgy dessert.

The Woollahra-based author, who has lived in India on and off for more than 20 years, uses the flour with a little salt and crushed cardamom seeds to make a batter in which she deep-fries sardine fillets or spinach leaves as snacks to serve with drinks.

A favourite use is to make a batter made with chickpea flour and enough water to create a consistency of pouring cream. She runs this though a sieve and then into hot oil where it's fried and served as a crunchy snack (boondi).


Chickpea flour: Everything you need to know

Chickpea flour is mildly nutty, earthy and gluten-free. Photo: Richard Cornish

Chickpea flour is what it says on the pack: flour made from white chickpeas. It is coarser than Indian chickpea flour, called besan or gram flour, gram being Bengali for chickpea.

Why do we love it?

Mildly nutty, earthy and extremely nutritious, chickpea flour has come to the rescue of Western cooks and chefs looking for a gluten-free alternative to wheat-based flour.

High in fibre and antioxidants and with twice the protein of wheat flour, it is handy for binding, thickening and adding bulk to dishes.

Who uses it?

Charmaine O'Brien, author of The Penguin Food Guide to India, says chickpea flour is essential to many Indian dishes, from deep-fried pakoras, a type of vegetable fritter, to the very sweet and fragrant halwa, a fudgy dessert.

The Woollahra-based author, who has lived in India on and off for more than 20 years, uses the flour with a little salt and crushed cardamom seeds to make a batter in which she deep-fries sardine fillets or spinach leaves as snacks to serve with drinks.

A favourite use is to make a batter made with chickpea flour and enough water to create a consistency of pouring cream. She runs this though a sieve and then into hot oil where it's fried and served as a crunchy snack (boondi).



Comments:

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  2. Huey

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