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Chicago Finally Gets On Board with Food Truck Ordinance

Chicago Finally Gets On Board with Food Truck Ordinance

Mayor Rahm Emanuel wants to allow food truck owners to cook in their vehicles

Chicago has long been falling behind in the world of food trucks, particularly because for the longest time the food hawkers weren't allowed to cook in their vehicles.

That may all change, however; Mayor Rahm Emanuel is proposing to change that rule and allow Chicago food truck owners to cook in their trucks.

Of course, this comes with a price. The proposed ordinance also requires that food trucks stay 200 feet away from restaurants (so there isn't much competition), park in designated "food stands," and attach GPS tracking devices. Emanuel will introduce the ordinance today.

Naturally, with all food truck news, the restaurant storefront owners are a bit miffed at the first part of the ordinance (competition!) and the food truck owners are ticked off at the restrictions for parking. Everyone else, however, should be at glad that Chicago is catching up with the rest of the world.

Jessica Chou is an associate editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @jesschou.


It's Not You, It's Brie

Everyone knows the stereotype. College kids and ramen noodles go hand and hand--it's just a given. After all, living on a college budget isn't easy and it's hard to deny that a meal for about 50 cents sounds pretty appealing. Ramen noodles are great, but there is nothing more unsatisfying than eating something then finding yourself more hungry than you were before. Luckily for you, I have found the solution--DIY ramen bowls, aka the trend of 2016 that hasn't hit yet. It is actually very easy to make a meal out of ramen noodles, the problem is simply that the type of person to make ramen is also the type who probably lives in a space not meant for cooking or out of laziness chooses not to cook. This recipe works in both scenarios, because if you can cut something and put it into a pot of boiling water, you can make it.
Just a side note. I have chosen not to add a soft-boiled egg to the soup because I am honestly just not a fan, but if that appeases you, all it takes is another pot of boiling water. Also it makes for an even prettier picture on Instagram, if you're into that like I am. In this case, a prettier picture was not worth a wasted egg.
As for the ramen noodles themselves, I opted to use a can of chicken stock as the soup base rather than the dehydrated chicken flavoring packet, but feel free to use that if you prefer. A little fun fact that I learned while searching for inspiration: ramen noodles are actually deep fried before being dehydrated, so I guess I shouldn't add that to the list of health foods. Finally on to my creation, albeit not mind-blowing, but definitely more impressive than some noodles in a bowl, or even left in a paper cup.

Ramen Bowl
1 can of chicken stock
1 package of instant ramen noodles
Baby bok choy (1 per package of noodles)
Carrots(3 medium sized per package)
Egg(optional)
Grilled chicken breast (sliced): if you don't have the time, buy a piece from the store and reheat

Essentially this is just reassembling pieces once the vegetables are cooked. The carrots were placed in boiling water for about twenty minutes, but only about 5 minutes is necessary for the bok choy. It is also dependent upon the heat, which is very difficult to control on an electric stovetop like mine. Enjoy!


It's Not You, It's Brie

Everyone knows the stereotype. College kids and ramen noodles go hand and hand--it's just a given. After all, living on a college budget isn't easy and it's hard to deny that a meal for about 50 cents sounds pretty appealing. Ramen noodles are great, but there is nothing more unsatisfying than eating something then finding yourself more hungry than you were before. Luckily for you, I have found the solution--DIY ramen bowls, aka the trend of 2016 that hasn't hit yet. It is actually very easy to make a meal out of ramen noodles, the problem is simply that the type of person to make ramen is also the type who probably lives in a space not meant for cooking or out of laziness chooses not to cook. This recipe works in both scenarios, because if you can cut something and put it into a pot of boiling water, you can make it.
Just a side note. I have chosen not to add a soft-boiled egg to the soup because I am honestly just not a fan, but if that appeases you, all it takes is another pot of boiling water. Also it makes for an even prettier picture on Instagram, if you're into that like I am. In this case, a prettier picture was not worth a wasted egg.
As for the ramen noodles themselves, I opted to use a can of chicken stock as the soup base rather than the dehydrated chicken flavoring packet, but feel free to use that if you prefer. A little fun fact that I learned while searching for inspiration: ramen noodles are actually deep fried before being dehydrated, so I guess I shouldn't add that to the list of health foods. Finally on to my creation, albeit not mind-blowing, but definitely more impressive than some noodles in a bowl, or even left in a paper cup.

Ramen Bowl
1 can of chicken stock
1 package of instant ramen noodles
Baby bok choy (1 per package of noodles)
Carrots(3 medium sized per package)
Egg(optional)
Grilled chicken breast (sliced): if you don't have the time, buy a piece from the store and reheat

Essentially this is just reassembling pieces once the vegetables are cooked. The carrots were placed in boiling water for about twenty minutes, but only about 5 minutes is necessary for the bok choy. It is also dependent upon the heat, which is very difficult to control on an electric stovetop like mine. Enjoy!


It's Not You, It's Brie

Everyone knows the stereotype. College kids and ramen noodles go hand and hand--it's just a given. After all, living on a college budget isn't easy and it's hard to deny that a meal for about 50 cents sounds pretty appealing. Ramen noodles are great, but there is nothing more unsatisfying than eating something then finding yourself more hungry than you were before. Luckily for you, I have found the solution--DIY ramen bowls, aka the trend of 2016 that hasn't hit yet. It is actually very easy to make a meal out of ramen noodles, the problem is simply that the type of person to make ramen is also the type who probably lives in a space not meant for cooking or out of laziness chooses not to cook. This recipe works in both scenarios, because if you can cut something and put it into a pot of boiling water, you can make it.
Just a side note. I have chosen not to add a soft-boiled egg to the soup because I am honestly just not a fan, but if that appeases you, all it takes is another pot of boiling water. Also it makes for an even prettier picture on Instagram, if you're into that like I am. In this case, a prettier picture was not worth a wasted egg.
As for the ramen noodles themselves, I opted to use a can of chicken stock as the soup base rather than the dehydrated chicken flavoring packet, but feel free to use that if you prefer. A little fun fact that I learned while searching for inspiration: ramen noodles are actually deep fried before being dehydrated, so I guess I shouldn't add that to the list of health foods. Finally on to my creation, albeit not mind-blowing, but definitely more impressive than some noodles in a bowl, or even left in a paper cup.

Ramen Bowl
1 can of chicken stock
1 package of instant ramen noodles
Baby bok choy (1 per package of noodles)
Carrots(3 medium sized per package)
Egg(optional)
Grilled chicken breast (sliced): if you don't have the time, buy a piece from the store and reheat

Essentially this is just reassembling pieces once the vegetables are cooked. The carrots were placed in boiling water for about twenty minutes, but only about 5 minutes is necessary for the bok choy. It is also dependent upon the heat, which is very difficult to control on an electric stovetop like mine. Enjoy!


It's Not You, It's Brie

Everyone knows the stereotype. College kids and ramen noodles go hand and hand--it's just a given. After all, living on a college budget isn't easy and it's hard to deny that a meal for about 50 cents sounds pretty appealing. Ramen noodles are great, but there is nothing more unsatisfying than eating something then finding yourself more hungry than you were before. Luckily for you, I have found the solution--DIY ramen bowls, aka the trend of 2016 that hasn't hit yet. It is actually very easy to make a meal out of ramen noodles, the problem is simply that the type of person to make ramen is also the type who probably lives in a space not meant for cooking or out of laziness chooses not to cook. This recipe works in both scenarios, because if you can cut something and put it into a pot of boiling water, you can make it.
Just a side note. I have chosen not to add a soft-boiled egg to the soup because I am honestly just not a fan, but if that appeases you, all it takes is another pot of boiling water. Also it makes for an even prettier picture on Instagram, if you're into that like I am. In this case, a prettier picture was not worth a wasted egg.
As for the ramen noodles themselves, I opted to use a can of chicken stock as the soup base rather than the dehydrated chicken flavoring packet, but feel free to use that if you prefer. A little fun fact that I learned while searching for inspiration: ramen noodles are actually deep fried before being dehydrated, so I guess I shouldn't add that to the list of health foods. Finally on to my creation, albeit not mind-blowing, but definitely more impressive than some noodles in a bowl, or even left in a paper cup.

Ramen Bowl
1 can of chicken stock
1 package of instant ramen noodles
Baby bok choy (1 per package of noodles)
Carrots(3 medium sized per package)
Egg(optional)
Grilled chicken breast (sliced): if you don't have the time, buy a piece from the store and reheat

Essentially this is just reassembling pieces once the vegetables are cooked. The carrots were placed in boiling water for about twenty minutes, but only about 5 minutes is necessary for the bok choy. It is also dependent upon the heat, which is very difficult to control on an electric stovetop like mine. Enjoy!


It's Not You, It's Brie

Everyone knows the stereotype. College kids and ramen noodles go hand and hand--it's just a given. After all, living on a college budget isn't easy and it's hard to deny that a meal for about 50 cents sounds pretty appealing. Ramen noodles are great, but there is nothing more unsatisfying than eating something then finding yourself more hungry than you were before. Luckily for you, I have found the solution--DIY ramen bowls, aka the trend of 2016 that hasn't hit yet. It is actually very easy to make a meal out of ramen noodles, the problem is simply that the type of person to make ramen is also the type who probably lives in a space not meant for cooking or out of laziness chooses not to cook. This recipe works in both scenarios, because if you can cut something and put it into a pot of boiling water, you can make it.
Just a side note. I have chosen not to add a soft-boiled egg to the soup because I am honestly just not a fan, but if that appeases you, all it takes is another pot of boiling water. Also it makes for an even prettier picture on Instagram, if you're into that like I am. In this case, a prettier picture was not worth a wasted egg.
As for the ramen noodles themselves, I opted to use a can of chicken stock as the soup base rather than the dehydrated chicken flavoring packet, but feel free to use that if you prefer. A little fun fact that I learned while searching for inspiration: ramen noodles are actually deep fried before being dehydrated, so I guess I shouldn't add that to the list of health foods. Finally on to my creation, albeit not mind-blowing, but definitely more impressive than some noodles in a bowl, or even left in a paper cup.

Ramen Bowl
1 can of chicken stock
1 package of instant ramen noodles
Baby bok choy (1 per package of noodles)
Carrots(3 medium sized per package)
Egg(optional)
Grilled chicken breast (sliced): if you don't have the time, buy a piece from the store and reheat

Essentially this is just reassembling pieces once the vegetables are cooked. The carrots were placed in boiling water for about twenty minutes, but only about 5 minutes is necessary for the bok choy. It is also dependent upon the heat, which is very difficult to control on an electric stovetop like mine. Enjoy!


It's Not You, It's Brie

Everyone knows the stereotype. College kids and ramen noodles go hand and hand--it's just a given. After all, living on a college budget isn't easy and it's hard to deny that a meal for about 50 cents sounds pretty appealing. Ramen noodles are great, but there is nothing more unsatisfying than eating something then finding yourself more hungry than you were before. Luckily for you, I have found the solution--DIY ramen bowls, aka the trend of 2016 that hasn't hit yet. It is actually very easy to make a meal out of ramen noodles, the problem is simply that the type of person to make ramen is also the type who probably lives in a space not meant for cooking or out of laziness chooses not to cook. This recipe works in both scenarios, because if you can cut something and put it into a pot of boiling water, you can make it.
Just a side note. I have chosen not to add a soft-boiled egg to the soup because I am honestly just not a fan, but if that appeases you, all it takes is another pot of boiling water. Also it makes for an even prettier picture on Instagram, if you're into that like I am. In this case, a prettier picture was not worth a wasted egg.
As for the ramen noodles themselves, I opted to use a can of chicken stock as the soup base rather than the dehydrated chicken flavoring packet, but feel free to use that if you prefer. A little fun fact that I learned while searching for inspiration: ramen noodles are actually deep fried before being dehydrated, so I guess I shouldn't add that to the list of health foods. Finally on to my creation, albeit not mind-blowing, but definitely more impressive than some noodles in a bowl, or even left in a paper cup.

Ramen Bowl
1 can of chicken stock
1 package of instant ramen noodles
Baby bok choy (1 per package of noodles)
Carrots(3 medium sized per package)
Egg(optional)
Grilled chicken breast (sliced): if you don't have the time, buy a piece from the store and reheat

Essentially this is just reassembling pieces once the vegetables are cooked. The carrots were placed in boiling water for about twenty minutes, but only about 5 minutes is necessary for the bok choy. It is also dependent upon the heat, which is very difficult to control on an electric stovetop like mine. Enjoy!


It's Not You, It's Brie

Everyone knows the stereotype. College kids and ramen noodles go hand and hand--it's just a given. After all, living on a college budget isn't easy and it's hard to deny that a meal for about 50 cents sounds pretty appealing. Ramen noodles are great, but there is nothing more unsatisfying than eating something then finding yourself more hungry than you were before. Luckily for you, I have found the solution--DIY ramen bowls, aka the trend of 2016 that hasn't hit yet. It is actually very easy to make a meal out of ramen noodles, the problem is simply that the type of person to make ramen is also the type who probably lives in a space not meant for cooking or out of laziness chooses not to cook. This recipe works in both scenarios, because if you can cut something and put it into a pot of boiling water, you can make it.
Just a side note. I have chosen not to add a soft-boiled egg to the soup because I am honestly just not a fan, but if that appeases you, all it takes is another pot of boiling water. Also it makes for an even prettier picture on Instagram, if you're into that like I am. In this case, a prettier picture was not worth a wasted egg.
As for the ramen noodles themselves, I opted to use a can of chicken stock as the soup base rather than the dehydrated chicken flavoring packet, but feel free to use that if you prefer. A little fun fact that I learned while searching for inspiration: ramen noodles are actually deep fried before being dehydrated, so I guess I shouldn't add that to the list of health foods. Finally on to my creation, albeit not mind-blowing, but definitely more impressive than some noodles in a bowl, or even left in a paper cup.

Ramen Bowl
1 can of chicken stock
1 package of instant ramen noodles
Baby bok choy (1 per package of noodles)
Carrots(3 medium sized per package)
Egg(optional)
Grilled chicken breast (sliced): if you don't have the time, buy a piece from the store and reheat

Essentially this is just reassembling pieces once the vegetables are cooked. The carrots were placed in boiling water for about twenty minutes, but only about 5 minutes is necessary for the bok choy. It is also dependent upon the heat, which is very difficult to control on an electric stovetop like mine. Enjoy!


It's Not You, It's Brie

Everyone knows the stereotype. College kids and ramen noodles go hand and hand--it's just a given. After all, living on a college budget isn't easy and it's hard to deny that a meal for about 50 cents sounds pretty appealing. Ramen noodles are great, but there is nothing more unsatisfying than eating something then finding yourself more hungry than you were before. Luckily for you, I have found the solution--DIY ramen bowls, aka the trend of 2016 that hasn't hit yet. It is actually very easy to make a meal out of ramen noodles, the problem is simply that the type of person to make ramen is also the type who probably lives in a space not meant for cooking or out of laziness chooses not to cook. This recipe works in both scenarios, because if you can cut something and put it into a pot of boiling water, you can make it.
Just a side note. I have chosen not to add a soft-boiled egg to the soup because I am honestly just not a fan, but if that appeases you, all it takes is another pot of boiling water. Also it makes for an even prettier picture on Instagram, if you're into that like I am. In this case, a prettier picture was not worth a wasted egg.
As for the ramen noodles themselves, I opted to use a can of chicken stock as the soup base rather than the dehydrated chicken flavoring packet, but feel free to use that if you prefer. A little fun fact that I learned while searching for inspiration: ramen noodles are actually deep fried before being dehydrated, so I guess I shouldn't add that to the list of health foods. Finally on to my creation, albeit not mind-blowing, but definitely more impressive than some noodles in a bowl, or even left in a paper cup.

Ramen Bowl
1 can of chicken stock
1 package of instant ramen noodles
Baby bok choy (1 per package of noodles)
Carrots(3 medium sized per package)
Egg(optional)
Grilled chicken breast (sliced): if you don't have the time, buy a piece from the store and reheat

Essentially this is just reassembling pieces once the vegetables are cooked. The carrots were placed in boiling water for about twenty minutes, but only about 5 minutes is necessary for the bok choy. It is also dependent upon the heat, which is very difficult to control on an electric stovetop like mine. Enjoy!


It's Not You, It's Brie

Everyone knows the stereotype. College kids and ramen noodles go hand and hand--it's just a given. After all, living on a college budget isn't easy and it's hard to deny that a meal for about 50 cents sounds pretty appealing. Ramen noodles are great, but there is nothing more unsatisfying than eating something then finding yourself more hungry than you were before. Luckily for you, I have found the solution--DIY ramen bowls, aka the trend of 2016 that hasn't hit yet. It is actually very easy to make a meal out of ramen noodles, the problem is simply that the type of person to make ramen is also the type who probably lives in a space not meant for cooking or out of laziness chooses not to cook. This recipe works in both scenarios, because if you can cut something and put it into a pot of boiling water, you can make it.
Just a side note. I have chosen not to add a soft-boiled egg to the soup because I am honestly just not a fan, but if that appeases you, all it takes is another pot of boiling water. Also it makes for an even prettier picture on Instagram, if you're into that like I am. In this case, a prettier picture was not worth a wasted egg.
As for the ramen noodles themselves, I opted to use a can of chicken stock as the soup base rather than the dehydrated chicken flavoring packet, but feel free to use that if you prefer. A little fun fact that I learned while searching for inspiration: ramen noodles are actually deep fried before being dehydrated, so I guess I shouldn't add that to the list of health foods. Finally on to my creation, albeit not mind-blowing, but definitely more impressive than some noodles in a bowl, or even left in a paper cup.

Ramen Bowl
1 can of chicken stock
1 package of instant ramen noodles
Baby bok choy (1 per package of noodles)
Carrots(3 medium sized per package)
Egg(optional)
Grilled chicken breast (sliced): if you don't have the time, buy a piece from the store and reheat

Essentially this is just reassembling pieces once the vegetables are cooked. The carrots were placed in boiling water for about twenty minutes, but only about 5 minutes is necessary for the bok choy. It is also dependent upon the heat, which is very difficult to control on an electric stovetop like mine. Enjoy!


It's Not You, It's Brie

Everyone knows the stereotype. College kids and ramen noodles go hand and hand--it's just a given. After all, living on a college budget isn't easy and it's hard to deny that a meal for about 50 cents sounds pretty appealing. Ramen noodles are great, but there is nothing more unsatisfying than eating something then finding yourself more hungry than you were before. Luckily for you, I have found the solution--DIY ramen bowls, aka the trend of 2016 that hasn't hit yet. It is actually very easy to make a meal out of ramen noodles, the problem is simply that the type of person to make ramen is also the type who probably lives in a space not meant for cooking or out of laziness chooses not to cook. This recipe works in both scenarios, because if you can cut something and put it into a pot of boiling water, you can make it.
Just a side note. I have chosen not to add a soft-boiled egg to the soup because I am honestly just not a fan, but if that appeases you, all it takes is another pot of boiling water. Also it makes for an even prettier picture on Instagram, if you're into that like I am. In this case, a prettier picture was not worth a wasted egg.
As for the ramen noodles themselves, I opted to use a can of chicken stock as the soup base rather than the dehydrated chicken flavoring packet, but feel free to use that if you prefer. A little fun fact that I learned while searching for inspiration: ramen noodles are actually deep fried before being dehydrated, so I guess I shouldn't add that to the list of health foods. Finally on to my creation, albeit not mind-blowing, but definitely more impressive than some noodles in a bowl, or even left in a paper cup.

Ramen Bowl
1 can of chicken stock
1 package of instant ramen noodles
Baby bok choy (1 per package of noodles)
Carrots(3 medium sized per package)
Egg(optional)
Grilled chicken breast (sliced): if you don't have the time, buy a piece from the store and reheat

Essentially this is just reassembling pieces once the vegetables are cooked. The carrots were placed in boiling water for about twenty minutes, but only about 5 minutes is necessary for the bok choy. It is also dependent upon the heat, which is very difficult to control on an electric stovetop like mine. Enjoy!