New recipes

Don’t Plant Those Cheerios Seeds! They May Grow Into Highly Invasive Plants

Don’t Plant Those Cheerios Seeds! They May Grow Into Highly Invasive Plants

Cheerios gave away millions of wildflower seeds to save the bees…t The only problem? Some are invasive pest plants

General Mills/ Wikimedia Commons

There’s always a catch, isn’t there?

Last week we reported that the cheery cereal mascot BuzzBee had been removed from Honey Nut Cheerios boxes to call attention to the global disappearance of bees. General Mills is encouraging direct action by handing out millions of wildflower seeds inside boxes of Cheerios.

While this may sound like a great idea in theory, Lifehacker figured out that some of the wildflower species included with your cereal purchase might not be very bee-friendly. The California poppy is considered an invasive exotic pest plant in the Southeast. The forget-me-not is banned as a noxious weed in Massachusetts and Connecticut. Many of the other plant species are not native to the United States at all, so they might not be a good match for bee species to pollinate in these parts.

“No plant is inherently ‘bad’, but many species can and have caused a great deal of damage when they are introduced into locations outside of their native range,” ecologist and invasive plant specialist Kathryn Turner told Lifehacker. “Invasive species can out-compete the natives they encounter, they can take up all the space and use up all the resources, they can spread disease and cause other physical changes to their new homes.”

In a separate statement, General Mills has denied that the wildflower seeds selected would grow up to be invasive or harmful.

"[These flowers] were selected for their flowers which produce nectar and pollen that are attractive to bees and other pollinators,” General Mills said in a statement. "The mixture contains annuals, biennials, and perennials that produce flowers throughout the entire growing season (early, mid, and late) in a wide range of colors. The seed varieties in the mix are not considered invasive."


Growing Mulberries: A Complete Guide on How to Plant, Grow, & Harvest Mulberries

Ame lives off-the-grid on her beautiful farm in Falmouth, Kentucky. She has been gardening organically for over 30 years and has grown vegetables, fruits, herbs, flowers, and ornamentals. She also participates in Farmers Markets, CSA, and mentors young farmers. Ame is the founder and director of Fox Run Environmental Education Center where she teaches environmental education programs in self-sufficiency, herbal medicine, green building, and wildlife conservation.

The marvelous mulberry is a highly underrated plant. It’s easy to grow, with mouthwatering fruit that tastes good in everything from wine to sorbet. If you’re hoping to add a fruit tree to your garden, you should give them a look.

Some people avoid mulberries because they have a reputation for being messy and invasive. That’s not entirely deserved, since it’s all about where you plant and what your goals are. If you’re considering growing mulberries, we’ll show you how to make them work for your space.

The fruit of the mulberry tree looks similar to an elongated blackberry and comes in sweet and tart species. They’re hardy, fast growers and dependable producers. Mulberries have medicinal qualities, and you can use the fruit as a dye. You can also use the wood in fencing and furniture making.

Mulberries are part of the Moraceae family, which includes figs and breadfruits. In North America, we have both native and Asian varieties. The red varieties are native to North America, and the purple and white ones are native to Asia. Industrious settlers brought mulberries over from China in 1621 in the hopes of starting a silk trade in Virginia. The industry never took off, but the trees stuck around.

Read on for our tips on growing mulberries to find the best type of tree for your yard, the best place to plant it and how to care for your mulberry.


Growing Mulberries: A Complete Guide on How to Plant, Grow, & Harvest Mulberries

Ame lives off-the-grid on her beautiful farm in Falmouth, Kentucky. She has been gardening organically for over 30 years and has grown vegetables, fruits, herbs, flowers, and ornamentals. She also participates in Farmers Markets, CSA, and mentors young farmers. Ame is the founder and director of Fox Run Environmental Education Center where she teaches environmental education programs in self-sufficiency, herbal medicine, green building, and wildlife conservation.

The marvelous mulberry is a highly underrated plant. It’s easy to grow, with mouthwatering fruit that tastes good in everything from wine to sorbet. If you’re hoping to add a fruit tree to your garden, you should give them a look.

Some people avoid mulberries because they have a reputation for being messy and invasive. That’s not entirely deserved, since it’s all about where you plant and what your goals are. If you’re considering growing mulberries, we’ll show you how to make them work for your space.

The fruit of the mulberry tree looks similar to an elongated blackberry and comes in sweet and tart species. They’re hardy, fast growers and dependable producers. Mulberries have medicinal qualities, and you can use the fruit as a dye. You can also use the wood in fencing and furniture making.

Mulberries are part of the Moraceae family, which includes figs and breadfruits. In North America, we have both native and Asian varieties. The red varieties are native to North America, and the purple and white ones are native to Asia. Industrious settlers brought mulberries over from China in 1621 in the hopes of starting a silk trade in Virginia. The industry never took off, but the trees stuck around.

Read on for our tips on growing mulberries to find the best type of tree for your yard, the best place to plant it and how to care for your mulberry.


Growing Mulberries: A Complete Guide on How to Plant, Grow, & Harvest Mulberries

Ame lives off-the-grid on her beautiful farm in Falmouth, Kentucky. She has been gardening organically for over 30 years and has grown vegetables, fruits, herbs, flowers, and ornamentals. She also participates in Farmers Markets, CSA, and mentors young farmers. Ame is the founder and director of Fox Run Environmental Education Center where she teaches environmental education programs in self-sufficiency, herbal medicine, green building, and wildlife conservation.

The marvelous mulberry is a highly underrated plant. It’s easy to grow, with mouthwatering fruit that tastes good in everything from wine to sorbet. If you’re hoping to add a fruit tree to your garden, you should give them a look.

Some people avoid mulberries because they have a reputation for being messy and invasive. That’s not entirely deserved, since it’s all about where you plant and what your goals are. If you’re considering growing mulberries, we’ll show you how to make them work for your space.

The fruit of the mulberry tree looks similar to an elongated blackberry and comes in sweet and tart species. They’re hardy, fast growers and dependable producers. Mulberries have medicinal qualities, and you can use the fruit as a dye. You can also use the wood in fencing and furniture making.

Mulberries are part of the Moraceae family, which includes figs and breadfruits. In North America, we have both native and Asian varieties. The red varieties are native to North America, and the purple and white ones are native to Asia. Industrious settlers brought mulberries over from China in 1621 in the hopes of starting a silk trade in Virginia. The industry never took off, but the trees stuck around.

Read on for our tips on growing mulberries to find the best type of tree for your yard, the best place to plant it and how to care for your mulberry.


Growing Mulberries: A Complete Guide on How to Plant, Grow, & Harvest Mulberries

Ame lives off-the-grid on her beautiful farm in Falmouth, Kentucky. She has been gardening organically for over 30 years and has grown vegetables, fruits, herbs, flowers, and ornamentals. She also participates in Farmers Markets, CSA, and mentors young farmers. Ame is the founder and director of Fox Run Environmental Education Center where she teaches environmental education programs in self-sufficiency, herbal medicine, green building, and wildlife conservation.

The marvelous mulberry is a highly underrated plant. It’s easy to grow, with mouthwatering fruit that tastes good in everything from wine to sorbet. If you’re hoping to add a fruit tree to your garden, you should give them a look.

Some people avoid mulberries because they have a reputation for being messy and invasive. That’s not entirely deserved, since it’s all about where you plant and what your goals are. If you’re considering growing mulberries, we’ll show you how to make them work for your space.

The fruit of the mulberry tree looks similar to an elongated blackberry and comes in sweet and tart species. They’re hardy, fast growers and dependable producers. Mulberries have medicinal qualities, and you can use the fruit as a dye. You can also use the wood in fencing and furniture making.

Mulberries are part of the Moraceae family, which includes figs and breadfruits. In North America, we have both native and Asian varieties. The red varieties are native to North America, and the purple and white ones are native to Asia. Industrious settlers brought mulberries over from China in 1621 in the hopes of starting a silk trade in Virginia. The industry never took off, but the trees stuck around.

Read on for our tips on growing mulberries to find the best type of tree for your yard, the best place to plant it and how to care for your mulberry.


Growing Mulberries: A Complete Guide on How to Plant, Grow, & Harvest Mulberries

Ame lives off-the-grid on her beautiful farm in Falmouth, Kentucky. She has been gardening organically for over 30 years and has grown vegetables, fruits, herbs, flowers, and ornamentals. She also participates in Farmers Markets, CSA, and mentors young farmers. Ame is the founder and director of Fox Run Environmental Education Center where she teaches environmental education programs in self-sufficiency, herbal medicine, green building, and wildlife conservation.

The marvelous mulberry is a highly underrated plant. It’s easy to grow, with mouthwatering fruit that tastes good in everything from wine to sorbet. If you’re hoping to add a fruit tree to your garden, you should give them a look.

Some people avoid mulberries because they have a reputation for being messy and invasive. That’s not entirely deserved, since it’s all about where you plant and what your goals are. If you’re considering growing mulberries, we’ll show you how to make them work for your space.

The fruit of the mulberry tree looks similar to an elongated blackberry and comes in sweet and tart species. They’re hardy, fast growers and dependable producers. Mulberries have medicinal qualities, and you can use the fruit as a dye. You can also use the wood in fencing and furniture making.

Mulberries are part of the Moraceae family, which includes figs and breadfruits. In North America, we have both native and Asian varieties. The red varieties are native to North America, and the purple and white ones are native to Asia. Industrious settlers brought mulberries over from China in 1621 in the hopes of starting a silk trade in Virginia. The industry never took off, but the trees stuck around.

Read on for our tips on growing mulberries to find the best type of tree for your yard, the best place to plant it and how to care for your mulberry.


Growing Mulberries: A Complete Guide on How to Plant, Grow, & Harvest Mulberries

Ame lives off-the-grid on her beautiful farm in Falmouth, Kentucky. She has been gardening organically for over 30 years and has grown vegetables, fruits, herbs, flowers, and ornamentals. She also participates in Farmers Markets, CSA, and mentors young farmers. Ame is the founder and director of Fox Run Environmental Education Center where she teaches environmental education programs in self-sufficiency, herbal medicine, green building, and wildlife conservation.

The marvelous mulberry is a highly underrated plant. It’s easy to grow, with mouthwatering fruit that tastes good in everything from wine to sorbet. If you’re hoping to add a fruit tree to your garden, you should give them a look.

Some people avoid mulberries because they have a reputation for being messy and invasive. That’s not entirely deserved, since it’s all about where you plant and what your goals are. If you’re considering growing mulberries, we’ll show you how to make them work for your space.

The fruit of the mulberry tree looks similar to an elongated blackberry and comes in sweet and tart species. They’re hardy, fast growers and dependable producers. Mulberries have medicinal qualities, and you can use the fruit as a dye. You can also use the wood in fencing and furniture making.

Mulberries are part of the Moraceae family, which includes figs and breadfruits. In North America, we have both native and Asian varieties. The red varieties are native to North America, and the purple and white ones are native to Asia. Industrious settlers brought mulberries over from China in 1621 in the hopes of starting a silk trade in Virginia. The industry never took off, but the trees stuck around.

Read on for our tips on growing mulberries to find the best type of tree for your yard, the best place to plant it and how to care for your mulberry.


Growing Mulberries: A Complete Guide on How to Plant, Grow, & Harvest Mulberries

Ame lives off-the-grid on her beautiful farm in Falmouth, Kentucky. She has been gardening organically for over 30 years and has grown vegetables, fruits, herbs, flowers, and ornamentals. She also participates in Farmers Markets, CSA, and mentors young farmers. Ame is the founder and director of Fox Run Environmental Education Center where she teaches environmental education programs in self-sufficiency, herbal medicine, green building, and wildlife conservation.

The marvelous mulberry is a highly underrated plant. It’s easy to grow, with mouthwatering fruit that tastes good in everything from wine to sorbet. If you’re hoping to add a fruit tree to your garden, you should give them a look.

Some people avoid mulberries because they have a reputation for being messy and invasive. That’s not entirely deserved, since it’s all about where you plant and what your goals are. If you’re considering growing mulberries, we’ll show you how to make them work for your space.

The fruit of the mulberry tree looks similar to an elongated blackberry and comes in sweet and tart species. They’re hardy, fast growers and dependable producers. Mulberries have medicinal qualities, and you can use the fruit as a dye. You can also use the wood in fencing and furniture making.

Mulberries are part of the Moraceae family, which includes figs and breadfruits. In North America, we have both native and Asian varieties. The red varieties are native to North America, and the purple and white ones are native to Asia. Industrious settlers brought mulberries over from China in 1621 in the hopes of starting a silk trade in Virginia. The industry never took off, but the trees stuck around.

Read on for our tips on growing mulberries to find the best type of tree for your yard, the best place to plant it and how to care for your mulberry.


Growing Mulberries: A Complete Guide on How to Plant, Grow, & Harvest Mulberries

Ame lives off-the-grid on her beautiful farm in Falmouth, Kentucky. She has been gardening organically for over 30 years and has grown vegetables, fruits, herbs, flowers, and ornamentals. She also participates in Farmers Markets, CSA, and mentors young farmers. Ame is the founder and director of Fox Run Environmental Education Center where she teaches environmental education programs in self-sufficiency, herbal medicine, green building, and wildlife conservation.

The marvelous mulberry is a highly underrated plant. It’s easy to grow, with mouthwatering fruit that tastes good in everything from wine to sorbet. If you’re hoping to add a fruit tree to your garden, you should give them a look.

Some people avoid mulberries because they have a reputation for being messy and invasive. That’s not entirely deserved, since it’s all about where you plant and what your goals are. If you’re considering growing mulberries, we’ll show you how to make them work for your space.

The fruit of the mulberry tree looks similar to an elongated blackberry and comes in sweet and tart species. They’re hardy, fast growers and dependable producers. Mulberries have medicinal qualities, and you can use the fruit as a dye. You can also use the wood in fencing and furniture making.

Mulberries are part of the Moraceae family, which includes figs and breadfruits. In North America, we have both native and Asian varieties. The red varieties are native to North America, and the purple and white ones are native to Asia. Industrious settlers brought mulberries over from China in 1621 in the hopes of starting a silk trade in Virginia. The industry never took off, but the trees stuck around.

Read on for our tips on growing mulberries to find the best type of tree for your yard, the best place to plant it and how to care for your mulberry.


Growing Mulberries: A Complete Guide on How to Plant, Grow, & Harvest Mulberries

Ame lives off-the-grid on her beautiful farm in Falmouth, Kentucky. She has been gardening organically for over 30 years and has grown vegetables, fruits, herbs, flowers, and ornamentals. She also participates in Farmers Markets, CSA, and mentors young farmers. Ame is the founder and director of Fox Run Environmental Education Center where she teaches environmental education programs in self-sufficiency, herbal medicine, green building, and wildlife conservation.

The marvelous mulberry is a highly underrated plant. It’s easy to grow, with mouthwatering fruit that tastes good in everything from wine to sorbet. If you’re hoping to add a fruit tree to your garden, you should give them a look.

Some people avoid mulberries because they have a reputation for being messy and invasive. That’s not entirely deserved, since it’s all about where you plant and what your goals are. If you’re considering growing mulberries, we’ll show you how to make them work for your space.

The fruit of the mulberry tree looks similar to an elongated blackberry and comes in sweet and tart species. They’re hardy, fast growers and dependable producers. Mulberries have medicinal qualities, and you can use the fruit as a dye. You can also use the wood in fencing and furniture making.

Mulberries are part of the Moraceae family, which includes figs and breadfruits. In North America, we have both native and Asian varieties. The red varieties are native to North America, and the purple and white ones are native to Asia. Industrious settlers brought mulberries over from China in 1621 in the hopes of starting a silk trade in Virginia. The industry never took off, but the trees stuck around.

Read on for our tips on growing mulberries to find the best type of tree for your yard, the best place to plant it and how to care for your mulberry.


Growing Mulberries: A Complete Guide on How to Plant, Grow, & Harvest Mulberries

Ame lives off-the-grid on her beautiful farm in Falmouth, Kentucky. She has been gardening organically for over 30 years and has grown vegetables, fruits, herbs, flowers, and ornamentals. She also participates in Farmers Markets, CSA, and mentors young farmers. Ame is the founder and director of Fox Run Environmental Education Center where she teaches environmental education programs in self-sufficiency, herbal medicine, green building, and wildlife conservation.

The marvelous mulberry is a highly underrated plant. It’s easy to grow, with mouthwatering fruit that tastes good in everything from wine to sorbet. If you’re hoping to add a fruit tree to your garden, you should give them a look.

Some people avoid mulberries because they have a reputation for being messy and invasive. That’s not entirely deserved, since it’s all about where you plant and what your goals are. If you’re considering growing mulberries, we’ll show you how to make them work for your space.

The fruit of the mulberry tree looks similar to an elongated blackberry and comes in sweet and tart species. They’re hardy, fast growers and dependable producers. Mulberries have medicinal qualities, and you can use the fruit as a dye. You can also use the wood in fencing and furniture making.

Mulberries are part of the Moraceae family, which includes figs and breadfruits. In North America, we have both native and Asian varieties. The red varieties are native to North America, and the purple and white ones are native to Asia. Industrious settlers brought mulberries over from China in 1621 in the hopes of starting a silk trade in Virginia. The industry never took off, but the trees stuck around.

Read on for our tips on growing mulberries to find the best type of tree for your yard, the best place to plant it and how to care for your mulberry.


Watch the video: Πως κάνω φυτά από σπόρο σε δοχεία (December 2021).