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Jimmy Bradley Closing the Harrison after 14 Years in Tribeca

Jimmy Bradley Closing the Harrison after 14 Years in Tribeca

Jimmy Bradley's longtime Tribeca restaurant is the latest restaurant to be forced into closure after a steep rent increase.

Chef and restaurateur Jimmy Bradley will close the Harrison at the end of December, the chef announced on Twitter on Thursday, November 6.

I'm sad to announce the closing of The Harrison at the end of December. But we plan to go out with a bang! Come, drink & say farewell!

— Jimmy Bradley (@RedCatNYC) November 6, 2014

Bradley first opened The Harrison in Tribeca in October 2001, and weeks later received two stars from The New York Times, which described the restaurant as “a remarkably clear-eyed take” on a cuisine style that was “poised carefully between New American and fusion cooking.”

“Mr. Bradley never seems to force the issue with his food,” wrote then-Times critic William Grimes.

“He has an easy, natural style that makes his ideas seem almost inevitable.” Some of New York City’s most talented chefs, including Joey Campanaro and Amanda Freitag, made their bones at the Harrison before going on to open their own restaurants.

Like too many other great New York City restaurants this year, The Harrison’s closure is due to a sudden and steep increase in rent that will push a neighborhood staple out of its home. “I do not know why rents are so high,” Bradley told The Daily Meal. “And I don’t know why landlords don’t find value in longstanding, profitable relationships.”

Bradley has no future plans for The Harrison, although Bradley’s Chelsea restaurant, The Red Cat, remains open.

For the latest food and drink updates, visit our Food News page.

Karen Lo is an associate editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @appleplexy.


Platelist: 'Top Chef' Harold Dieterle Exudes Confidence in the Kitchen

Mar. 8, 2011— -- When restaurateur and "Top Chef" champion Harold Dieterle was a kid, he said he wanted to be a fighter pilot. But it wasn't meant to be.

"[My teacher's] quick response was that you don't have 20-20 vision, so you have to pick something else." he said.

Growing up on Long Island, Dieterle said he became hooked on cooking at age 15 when he took a home economics class in high school.

"I wasn't terribly popular in high school either so I kind of took to cooking with the scheme that if I took a home economics class, it would definitely help me meet girls," he said. "That's kind of how the cooking started."

Dieterle also credited his eclectic family for inspiring him to follow his passion for food, going as far back as the Sunday dinners that filled his childhood.

"There were always a lot of lovely Italian suppers going on, on the weekends," he said. "The family was always cooking together on Sundays. That's my mom's side of the family, a bunch of Sicilian crazy gals."

With German and Irish grandparents on his father's side, Dieterle said he learned to love many different styles of cuisine, but one recipe he kept close to his heart was his Sicilian grandmother's tomato sauce.

"People are constantly, always asking . 'Oh what's your favorite tomato sauce?'" he said. "We'll it's my grandmother's sauce and I try and replicate it all the time but not too many people are into pigs feet."

"The food that brings you back to your childhood is definitely the most rewarding, in my opinion," he added. "It makes you feel special."

Cooking became an excellent fit for Dieterle, who is now the owner of two restaurants in New York City, Perilla, a critically-acclaimed New American restaurant with Asian influences, and Kin Shop, which is devoted to Thai cuisine that was inspired by Dieterle's several trips to Thailand.

After graduating high school in 1995, Dieterle went to Spain to work in some of the country's top kitchens, and then came back to the United States to attend the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park, N.Y.


Platelist: 'Top Chef' Harold Dieterle Exudes Confidence in the Kitchen

Mar. 8, 2011— -- When restaurateur and "Top Chef" champion Harold Dieterle was a kid, he said he wanted to be a fighter pilot. But it wasn't meant to be.

"[My teacher's] quick response was that you don't have 20-20 vision, so you have to pick something else." he said.

Growing up on Long Island, Dieterle said he became hooked on cooking at age 15 when he took a home economics class in high school.

"I wasn't terribly popular in high school either so I kind of took to cooking with the scheme that if I took a home economics class, it would definitely help me meet girls," he said. "That's kind of how the cooking started."

Dieterle also credited his eclectic family for inspiring him to follow his passion for food, going as far back as the Sunday dinners that filled his childhood.

"There were always a lot of lovely Italian suppers going on, on the weekends," he said. "The family was always cooking together on Sundays. That's my mom's side of the family, a bunch of Sicilian crazy gals."

With German and Irish grandparents on his father's side, Dieterle said he learned to love many different styles of cuisine, but one recipe he kept close to his heart was his Sicilian grandmother's tomato sauce.

"People are constantly, always asking . 'Oh what's your favorite tomato sauce?'" he said. "We'll it's my grandmother's sauce and I try and replicate it all the time but not too many people are into pigs feet."

"The food that brings you back to your childhood is definitely the most rewarding, in my opinion," he added. "It makes you feel special."

Cooking became an excellent fit for Dieterle, who is now the owner of two restaurants in New York City, Perilla, a critically-acclaimed New American restaurant with Asian influences, and Kin Shop, which is devoted to Thai cuisine that was inspired by Dieterle's several trips to Thailand.

After graduating high school in 1995, Dieterle went to Spain to work in some of the country's top kitchens, and then came back to the United States to attend the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park, N.Y.


Platelist: 'Top Chef' Harold Dieterle Exudes Confidence in the Kitchen

Mar. 8, 2011— -- When restaurateur and "Top Chef" champion Harold Dieterle was a kid, he said he wanted to be a fighter pilot. But it wasn't meant to be.

"[My teacher's] quick response was that you don't have 20-20 vision, so you have to pick something else." he said.

Growing up on Long Island, Dieterle said he became hooked on cooking at age 15 when he took a home economics class in high school.

"I wasn't terribly popular in high school either so I kind of took to cooking with the scheme that if I took a home economics class, it would definitely help me meet girls," he said. "That's kind of how the cooking started."

Dieterle also credited his eclectic family for inspiring him to follow his passion for food, going as far back as the Sunday dinners that filled his childhood.

"There were always a lot of lovely Italian suppers going on, on the weekends," he said. "The family was always cooking together on Sundays. That's my mom's side of the family, a bunch of Sicilian crazy gals."

With German and Irish grandparents on his father's side, Dieterle said he learned to love many different styles of cuisine, but one recipe he kept close to his heart was his Sicilian grandmother's tomato sauce.

"People are constantly, always asking . 'Oh what's your favorite tomato sauce?'" he said. "We'll it's my grandmother's sauce and I try and replicate it all the time but not too many people are into pigs feet."

"The food that brings you back to your childhood is definitely the most rewarding, in my opinion," he added. "It makes you feel special."

Cooking became an excellent fit for Dieterle, who is now the owner of two restaurants in New York City, Perilla, a critically-acclaimed New American restaurant with Asian influences, and Kin Shop, which is devoted to Thai cuisine that was inspired by Dieterle's several trips to Thailand.

After graduating high school in 1995, Dieterle went to Spain to work in some of the country's top kitchens, and then came back to the United States to attend the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park, N.Y.


Platelist: 'Top Chef' Harold Dieterle Exudes Confidence in the Kitchen

Mar. 8, 2011— -- When restaurateur and "Top Chef" champion Harold Dieterle was a kid, he said he wanted to be a fighter pilot. But it wasn't meant to be.

"[My teacher's] quick response was that you don't have 20-20 vision, so you have to pick something else." he said.

Growing up on Long Island, Dieterle said he became hooked on cooking at age 15 when he took a home economics class in high school.

"I wasn't terribly popular in high school either so I kind of took to cooking with the scheme that if I took a home economics class, it would definitely help me meet girls," he said. "That's kind of how the cooking started."

Dieterle also credited his eclectic family for inspiring him to follow his passion for food, going as far back as the Sunday dinners that filled his childhood.

"There were always a lot of lovely Italian suppers going on, on the weekends," he said. "The family was always cooking together on Sundays. That's my mom's side of the family, a bunch of Sicilian crazy gals."

With German and Irish grandparents on his father's side, Dieterle said he learned to love many different styles of cuisine, but one recipe he kept close to his heart was his Sicilian grandmother's tomato sauce.

"People are constantly, always asking . 'Oh what's your favorite tomato sauce?'" he said. "We'll it's my grandmother's sauce and I try and replicate it all the time but not too many people are into pigs feet."

"The food that brings you back to your childhood is definitely the most rewarding, in my opinion," he added. "It makes you feel special."

Cooking became an excellent fit for Dieterle, who is now the owner of two restaurants in New York City, Perilla, a critically-acclaimed New American restaurant with Asian influences, and Kin Shop, which is devoted to Thai cuisine that was inspired by Dieterle's several trips to Thailand.

After graduating high school in 1995, Dieterle went to Spain to work in some of the country's top kitchens, and then came back to the United States to attend the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park, N.Y.


Platelist: 'Top Chef' Harold Dieterle Exudes Confidence in the Kitchen

Mar. 8, 2011— -- When restaurateur and "Top Chef" champion Harold Dieterle was a kid, he said he wanted to be a fighter pilot. But it wasn't meant to be.

"[My teacher's] quick response was that you don't have 20-20 vision, so you have to pick something else." he said.

Growing up on Long Island, Dieterle said he became hooked on cooking at age 15 when he took a home economics class in high school.

"I wasn't terribly popular in high school either so I kind of took to cooking with the scheme that if I took a home economics class, it would definitely help me meet girls," he said. "That's kind of how the cooking started."

Dieterle also credited his eclectic family for inspiring him to follow his passion for food, going as far back as the Sunday dinners that filled his childhood.

"There were always a lot of lovely Italian suppers going on, on the weekends," he said. "The family was always cooking together on Sundays. That's my mom's side of the family, a bunch of Sicilian crazy gals."

With German and Irish grandparents on his father's side, Dieterle said he learned to love many different styles of cuisine, but one recipe he kept close to his heart was his Sicilian grandmother's tomato sauce.

"People are constantly, always asking . 'Oh what's your favorite tomato sauce?'" he said. "We'll it's my grandmother's sauce and I try and replicate it all the time but not too many people are into pigs feet."

"The food that brings you back to your childhood is definitely the most rewarding, in my opinion," he added. "It makes you feel special."

Cooking became an excellent fit for Dieterle, who is now the owner of two restaurants in New York City, Perilla, a critically-acclaimed New American restaurant with Asian influences, and Kin Shop, which is devoted to Thai cuisine that was inspired by Dieterle's several trips to Thailand.

After graduating high school in 1995, Dieterle went to Spain to work in some of the country's top kitchens, and then came back to the United States to attend the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park, N.Y.


Platelist: 'Top Chef' Harold Dieterle Exudes Confidence in the Kitchen

Mar. 8, 2011— -- When restaurateur and "Top Chef" champion Harold Dieterle was a kid, he said he wanted to be a fighter pilot. But it wasn't meant to be.

"[My teacher's] quick response was that you don't have 20-20 vision, so you have to pick something else." he said.

Growing up on Long Island, Dieterle said he became hooked on cooking at age 15 when he took a home economics class in high school.

"I wasn't terribly popular in high school either so I kind of took to cooking with the scheme that if I took a home economics class, it would definitely help me meet girls," he said. "That's kind of how the cooking started."

Dieterle also credited his eclectic family for inspiring him to follow his passion for food, going as far back as the Sunday dinners that filled his childhood.

"There were always a lot of lovely Italian suppers going on, on the weekends," he said. "The family was always cooking together on Sundays. That's my mom's side of the family, a bunch of Sicilian crazy gals."

With German and Irish grandparents on his father's side, Dieterle said he learned to love many different styles of cuisine, but one recipe he kept close to his heart was his Sicilian grandmother's tomato sauce.

"People are constantly, always asking . 'Oh what's your favorite tomato sauce?'" he said. "We'll it's my grandmother's sauce and I try and replicate it all the time but not too many people are into pigs feet."

"The food that brings you back to your childhood is definitely the most rewarding, in my opinion," he added. "It makes you feel special."

Cooking became an excellent fit for Dieterle, who is now the owner of two restaurants in New York City, Perilla, a critically-acclaimed New American restaurant with Asian influences, and Kin Shop, which is devoted to Thai cuisine that was inspired by Dieterle's several trips to Thailand.

After graduating high school in 1995, Dieterle went to Spain to work in some of the country's top kitchens, and then came back to the United States to attend the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park, N.Y.


Platelist: 'Top Chef' Harold Dieterle Exudes Confidence in the Kitchen

Mar. 8, 2011— -- When restaurateur and "Top Chef" champion Harold Dieterle was a kid, he said he wanted to be a fighter pilot. But it wasn't meant to be.

"[My teacher's] quick response was that you don't have 20-20 vision, so you have to pick something else." he said.

Growing up on Long Island, Dieterle said he became hooked on cooking at age 15 when he took a home economics class in high school.

"I wasn't terribly popular in high school either so I kind of took to cooking with the scheme that if I took a home economics class, it would definitely help me meet girls," he said. "That's kind of how the cooking started."

Dieterle also credited his eclectic family for inspiring him to follow his passion for food, going as far back as the Sunday dinners that filled his childhood.

"There were always a lot of lovely Italian suppers going on, on the weekends," he said. "The family was always cooking together on Sundays. That's my mom's side of the family, a bunch of Sicilian crazy gals."

With German and Irish grandparents on his father's side, Dieterle said he learned to love many different styles of cuisine, but one recipe he kept close to his heart was his Sicilian grandmother's tomato sauce.

"People are constantly, always asking . 'Oh what's your favorite tomato sauce?'" he said. "We'll it's my grandmother's sauce and I try and replicate it all the time but not too many people are into pigs feet."

"The food that brings you back to your childhood is definitely the most rewarding, in my opinion," he added. "It makes you feel special."

Cooking became an excellent fit for Dieterle, who is now the owner of two restaurants in New York City, Perilla, a critically-acclaimed New American restaurant with Asian influences, and Kin Shop, which is devoted to Thai cuisine that was inspired by Dieterle's several trips to Thailand.

After graduating high school in 1995, Dieterle went to Spain to work in some of the country's top kitchens, and then came back to the United States to attend the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park, N.Y.


Platelist: 'Top Chef' Harold Dieterle Exudes Confidence in the Kitchen

Mar. 8, 2011— -- When restaurateur and "Top Chef" champion Harold Dieterle was a kid, he said he wanted to be a fighter pilot. But it wasn't meant to be.

"[My teacher's] quick response was that you don't have 20-20 vision, so you have to pick something else." he said.

Growing up on Long Island, Dieterle said he became hooked on cooking at age 15 when he took a home economics class in high school.

"I wasn't terribly popular in high school either so I kind of took to cooking with the scheme that if I took a home economics class, it would definitely help me meet girls," he said. "That's kind of how the cooking started."

Dieterle also credited his eclectic family for inspiring him to follow his passion for food, going as far back as the Sunday dinners that filled his childhood.

"There were always a lot of lovely Italian suppers going on, on the weekends," he said. "The family was always cooking together on Sundays. That's my mom's side of the family, a bunch of Sicilian crazy gals."

With German and Irish grandparents on his father's side, Dieterle said he learned to love many different styles of cuisine, but one recipe he kept close to his heart was his Sicilian grandmother's tomato sauce.

"People are constantly, always asking . 'Oh what's your favorite tomato sauce?'" he said. "We'll it's my grandmother's sauce and I try and replicate it all the time but not too many people are into pigs feet."

"The food that brings you back to your childhood is definitely the most rewarding, in my opinion," he added. "It makes you feel special."

Cooking became an excellent fit for Dieterle, who is now the owner of two restaurants in New York City, Perilla, a critically-acclaimed New American restaurant with Asian influences, and Kin Shop, which is devoted to Thai cuisine that was inspired by Dieterle's several trips to Thailand.

After graduating high school in 1995, Dieterle went to Spain to work in some of the country's top kitchens, and then came back to the United States to attend the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park, N.Y.


Platelist: 'Top Chef' Harold Dieterle Exudes Confidence in the Kitchen

Mar. 8, 2011— -- When restaurateur and "Top Chef" champion Harold Dieterle was a kid, he said he wanted to be a fighter pilot. But it wasn't meant to be.

"[My teacher's] quick response was that you don't have 20-20 vision, so you have to pick something else." he said.

Growing up on Long Island, Dieterle said he became hooked on cooking at age 15 when he took a home economics class in high school.

"I wasn't terribly popular in high school either so I kind of took to cooking with the scheme that if I took a home economics class, it would definitely help me meet girls," he said. "That's kind of how the cooking started."

Dieterle also credited his eclectic family for inspiring him to follow his passion for food, going as far back as the Sunday dinners that filled his childhood.

"There were always a lot of lovely Italian suppers going on, on the weekends," he said. "The family was always cooking together on Sundays. That's my mom's side of the family, a bunch of Sicilian crazy gals."

With German and Irish grandparents on his father's side, Dieterle said he learned to love many different styles of cuisine, but one recipe he kept close to his heart was his Sicilian grandmother's tomato sauce.

"People are constantly, always asking . 'Oh what's your favorite tomato sauce?'" he said. "We'll it's my grandmother's sauce and I try and replicate it all the time but not too many people are into pigs feet."

"The food that brings you back to your childhood is definitely the most rewarding, in my opinion," he added. "It makes you feel special."

Cooking became an excellent fit for Dieterle, who is now the owner of two restaurants in New York City, Perilla, a critically-acclaimed New American restaurant with Asian influences, and Kin Shop, which is devoted to Thai cuisine that was inspired by Dieterle's several trips to Thailand.

After graduating high school in 1995, Dieterle went to Spain to work in some of the country's top kitchens, and then came back to the United States to attend the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park, N.Y.


Platelist: 'Top Chef' Harold Dieterle Exudes Confidence in the Kitchen

Mar. 8, 2011— -- When restaurateur and "Top Chef" champion Harold Dieterle was a kid, he said he wanted to be a fighter pilot. But it wasn't meant to be.

"[My teacher's] quick response was that you don't have 20-20 vision, so you have to pick something else." he said.

Growing up on Long Island, Dieterle said he became hooked on cooking at age 15 when he took a home economics class in high school.

"I wasn't terribly popular in high school either so I kind of took to cooking with the scheme that if I took a home economics class, it would definitely help me meet girls," he said. "That's kind of how the cooking started."

Dieterle also credited his eclectic family for inspiring him to follow his passion for food, going as far back as the Sunday dinners that filled his childhood.

"There were always a lot of lovely Italian suppers going on, on the weekends," he said. "The family was always cooking together on Sundays. That's my mom's side of the family, a bunch of Sicilian crazy gals."

With German and Irish grandparents on his father's side, Dieterle said he learned to love many different styles of cuisine, but one recipe he kept close to his heart was his Sicilian grandmother's tomato sauce.

"People are constantly, always asking . 'Oh what's your favorite tomato sauce?'" he said. "We'll it's my grandmother's sauce and I try and replicate it all the time but not too many people are into pigs feet."

"The food that brings you back to your childhood is definitely the most rewarding, in my opinion," he added. "It makes you feel special."

Cooking became an excellent fit for Dieterle, who is now the owner of two restaurants in New York City, Perilla, a critically-acclaimed New American restaurant with Asian influences, and Kin Shop, which is devoted to Thai cuisine that was inspired by Dieterle's several trips to Thailand.

After graduating high school in 1995, Dieterle went to Spain to work in some of the country's top kitchens, and then came back to the United States to attend the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in Hyde Park, N.Y.


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