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Leftover turkey rice soup recipe

Leftover turkey rice soup recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Soup
  • Turkey soup

A simple but delicious turkey soup made with your leftover roast turkey carcass. Make this and freeze in batches for later!

2 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 1 turkey carcass
  • 15g butter
  • 3 sticks celery, chopped
  • 3 carrots, chopped
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 150g sweetcorn (frozen or tinned)
  • 180g rice
  • 110ml tomato juice
  • salt and pepper to taste

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:2hr30min ›Ready in:2hr40min

  1. Place turkey carcass in a large pot. Cover with water and simmer for 90 minutes. When done, remove the carcass and strain the stock into a clean bowl through a fine mesh sieve.
  2. Once cool enough to handle, pull all leftover turkey meat off of the bones, and discard the carcass. Set the turkey meat aside.
  3. In a clean pan, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the celery, carrot and onion. Cook until soft, about 5 minutes.
  4. Add the turkey stock to the pan along with the turkey meat, sweetcorn, rice and tomato juice. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Simmer for 45 minutes or until veg is tender and rice is cooked.

Tip

If you don't have tomato juice, use 2 tablespoons tomato puree diluted with enough water to make 110ml

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Recipe Summary

  • 4 cups chicken or turkey stock, preferably homemade
  • 2 medium leeks, white and light-green parts only, sliced into 1/2-inch-thick rounds and well washed
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, plus wedges for serving
  • 2 cups shredded cooked turkey or chicken
  • 1 1/2 cups cooked white rice
  • Chopped fresh dill and extra-virgin olive oil, for serving

In a medium pot, bring stock and 2 cups water to a simmer over medium-high heat add leeks and season with salt and pepper. Reduce heat to medium simmer until tender, about 8 minutes.

In a small heatproof bowl, whisk together egg yolks and lemon juice. Slowly whisk in 1 cup stock mixture, then gradually stir back into soup. Cook over medium-low heat, stirring, until creamy, 4 to 5 minutes. Stir in turkey and rice continue cooking until warmed through, 1 to 2 minutes. Season to taste. Serve with dill, more pepper, a drizzle of oil, and lemon wedges.


How to Make Turkey Soup

Stovetop: I like to make my soup on the stovetop because this really is a super simple recipe and only takes about 30 minutes to make!

First, in a large stockpot, over medium heat, I melt my butter and saute the celery and carrots for about 3 minutes. Then I add mushrooms and saute until they are slightly brown, usually takes around 3 minutes. Then I add the garlic and onions and saute for an additional two minutes.

Next, I add the broth and seasonings, turn up the heat and bring it to a boil. Once it is boiling, add the basmati or jasmine rice and cooked covered for 12 minutes. (Side note-you can substitute rice with potatoes or pasta if you prefer! )

Finally, I remove the lid, add in the leftover turkey and thyme and boil for an additional 5 minutes or until the rice is tender!

Instant Pot: to make this in the instant pot I would begin by sauteing my vegetables in the instant pot for 3-5 minutes. Then I would add the rest of my ingredients minus the turkey. Seal the pressure cooker and cook on manual for 5 minutes. Quick-release and then add the leftover turkey!

Slow Cooker: Add all the ingredients, minus the turkey to the slow cooker and cook on low for 6-7 hours. Then add turkey and cook for one more hour. Super easy!

Turkey Stock: One of my favorite thing to do with the leftover turkey carcass is to use it to make homemade turkey stock. In a large stockpot, put the leftover turkey bones, some carrots, onions and celery stocks. Cover it all with water and bring it to a boil. Once boiling, turn it down and let it simmer for 3-3.5 hours. Then strain your stock and you are done! It can stay in the refrigerator for up to a week and 3 months in the freezer.


How to tactfully lay dibs on the turkey bones

I&rsquom going to divide this strategy lessons into 3 parts. Before, during and after the meal.

Before the meal

  • The moment you hang up your jacket and take off your shoes &ndash begin your distraction technique. The cook has been up since 4 a.m. washing, chopping, baking, boiling, roasting for this one meal. Their mind is totally focused all the way up to the point of END OF DESSERT COURSE. Talk only about the meal itself. Do not bring up the subject of &ldquoleftovers&rdquo or &ldquoturkey bones.&rdquo If anyone else brings up the subject, quickly cut them off and say:

&ldquoDo I smell something burning?&rdquo BUT you can only play this &ldquoburning card&rdquo this ONCE in the evening. Any more than that, you might not be invited back next year.

  • Offer to carve the turkey. Do NOT let that turkey go uncarved to the table. If the turkey gets carved at the table, those sexy turkey bones are exposed in front of the entire table and game over. Now everyone is thinking about potential recipes for turkey bones.

During the meal

  • The seat closest to the kitchen is the MONEY SEAT. Before everyone else arrives, discreetly crumple up the napkin and take a drink from the water glass at that seat to lay claim.
  • When the cook triumphantly announces, &ldquoDinner is ready!&rdquo elegantly (but quickly) sashay to the table and stand behind the chair that you want. You can&rsquot be the first to sit down, that would be rude and way too obvious. But just one hand casually leaning against the back of the chair is fine.
  • Towards end of the meal, keep an eye for anyone finishing early. Do whatever you can to keep them at the table. Strike up engaging conversation with them. Ask OPEN ENDED QUESTIONS.

After the meal

  • Be the first to signal the end of dinner and establish dominance by puffing up your chest, stretching arms out and pushing your chair out.

&ldquoThank you for a lovely meal, name of host. It was truly a delightful Thanksgiving dinner! Let me help you clear the table.&rdquo and proceed to take your plate to the kitchen. Your host will surely follow behind you with an armful of dishes.

  • If someone other than cook follows you before host can get to kitchen, BLOCK and REDIRECT.

&ldquoOh, is that cranberry on your collar? That is going to stain! Quick! Take my Tide to Go stain pen.&rdquo

&ldquoWow, that&rsquos a lot of leftover turkey. You&rsquoll be eating turkey for weeks!&rdquo

  • By now, the host will be so stuffed of turkey, sick of turkey, focused on the piles of dirty dishes that she/he will not even think twice when you say:

Now you can make Turkey Congee, or rice porridge:

To me, the most successful leftover turkey dishes do NOT TASTE LIKE LEFTOVER TURKEY. There are countless recipes floating out on the web, but if it just tastes like Thanksgiving turkey but in a different form, what&rsquos the point?

Here&rsquos the secret to making your turkey congee taste incredibly wonderful &ndash dried scallops and dried shrimp.

You can find both in Asian markets. You only use a few pieces of each and it adds that mysterious &ldquoumami&rdquo dimension to your turkey congee. If you don&rsquot have either, that is fine, you can substitute with any of the following:


Creamy Turkey Rice Soup Made With Leftover Turkey Or Chicken!

We usually make this Creamy Turkey Rice Soup after Thanksgiving when we always have lots of leftover turkey. But we don&rsquot wait until Thanksgiving to make it, either! Grab a rotisserie chicken or a turkey breast from the grocery store and you can make this soup all year long.

This easy soup recipe can ever use up leftover vegetables from your Thanksgiving dinner like carrots or peas if you have them laying around. Just add them to this recipe or swap out the carrots and celery we have here.


Turkey and Rice Soup

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I use leftover turkey in many recipes, but my absolute favorite, must make every.single.year leftover turkey recipe is Turkey and Rice Soup. This soup is so frugal to make with Thanksgiving leftovers, but that is not why I make it. I make this soup because it is the embodiment of comfort food.

We often get our first big snow storm around Thanksgiving. This soup makes an easy, yet hearty dinner &ndash the perfect meal after spending time outside on a cold blustery day.

I use the bones from our Thanksgiving turkey to make turkey stock in my Crock Pot the day after Thanksgiving, then I use the stock in a variety of turkey recipes, but I always reserve 8 cups of stock to make this turkey and rice soup. If you don&rsquot have turkey stock, you can use chicken broth or vegetable broth to make this soup.


Leftover Turkey Wild Rice Soup

  • Author: Sam | Ahead of Thyme
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 45 minutes
  • Total Time: 55 minutes
  • Yield: 4 - 6 servings 1 x
  • Diet: Gluten Free

Description

Wholesome hearty one pot leftover turkey wild rice soup is the most comforting way to use leftover turkey from Thanksgiving turkey dinner. So easy to make.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • ½ cup onion, finely chopped
  • ½ cup celery, chopped into ½ -inch pieces
  • ¼ cup carrots, chopped into ½ -inch pieces
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, finely chopped
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 2 cups cooked turkey, shredded or cut into ½ -inch cubes
  • ½ cup wild rice, uncooked
  • ½ cup mushrooms, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable stock powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt (or to taste)
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper (or to taste)
  • 5 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon fresh parsley, finely chopped (for garnish)

Instructions

  1. Heat oil in a large pot over medium-high heat for 2 minutes until sizzling hot. Add onion, celery, carrots, thyme and bay leaves, and sauté for 5 minutes until the vegetables are soft and fragrant.
  2. Add turkey, rice and mushrooms. Stir and cook for another 3 minutes. Add vegetable stock powder, salt, and pepper. Stir well to mix.
  3. Add water and bring soup to a boil, about 5 minutes. Cover the lid and turn down to medium-low heat. Simmer for 35 to 40 minutes until most of the wild rice is soft and popped.
  4. Remove the bay leaves and serve in soup bowls. Sprinkle parsley on top to garnish, and squeeze some lemon juice if desired.

Notes

How to make it creamy: To make this soup creamy, stir in ½ cup of half and half cream at the end, after the soup is done simmering.

How to store : Keep the turkey wild rice soup in the pot (covered) and store in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. You can also transfer the soup into an airtight container for storing.

How to reheat : Reheat in the microwave or on the stove for a few minutes until hot and serve.

Keywords: leftover turkey wild rice soup, turkey wild rice soup, one pot turkey soup, turkey soup with wild rice, leftover turkey recipes


Made this with pheasant breasts. I simmered the whole breasts with water,carrots,celery,onions,garlic,salt,cracked bl pepper and 2 bay leaves..Removed the vegies and strained the stock, Wow. the flavor of the stock was so good! Cut breasts in small pieces with pre-cooked wild rice that I made during the stock. Added mushrooms,chopped carrots,celery,onions,garlic,bl pepper. Added evaporated 2% milk thickened with a little flour, chopped fresh italian parsley and sherry. Yum. the stock and the sherry gives it alot of flavor.

Really enjoyed this! I made this using white kidney beans and veggie broth to make it a vegetarian meal.

I have made this recipe for years and it never fails to please. It is full flavored, hearty, and perfect for a cold weather supper with a salad and some hot bread. And to make it even better, it is quick. It does get thick after refrigeration, but I just thin it with some extra milk or chicken broth and it is good to go.

I've been wanting to make this soup for a long time, so was very excited when I finally got my hands on some smoked turkey. I followed the recipe without making any additions or substitutions and ended up with what tasty like warm, smoky milk with chunks of turkey floating in it. I don't think I'll be making this one again.

Superb. I used 1% milk instead of 2% and used the smoked turkey from the deli. Served with a green salad and fruit for dessert.

WOW. This may be the best soup I've ever made, and among the best I've ever tasted. I made some substantial adjustments: added a large package of mushrooms, doubled the garlic, and added Spanish smoked sweet paprika and some chipotle chili powder. I suspect these two additions took this soup from good to great--worth the internet search/purchase. Also, I whipped up a medium-dark roux, then whisked the milk in. Uncooked flour in soup tastes like. well, FLOUR. A roux imparts the creaminess while adding some depth and flavor, rather than just acting to thicken the liquid. This roux: 4T butter, about 1/2 c. flour. Melt the butter, sprinkle the flour on top, whisk until thick and beginning to toast. It will seem like a really long time. Whisk the milk in, 1/2 cup at a time. Once it's all smooth and beginning to thicken, dump it in the soup. FABULOUS. I will make this over and over. My lunch guest went nuts when I served this with grilled brie sandwiches.


Step 1: In a 3-quart saucepan, sauté onion in butter over medium heat for 3-5 minutes, or until softened. Stir in celery, carrots, broth, and rice bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer until rice is nearly tender, 10 to 12 minutes.

Step 2: While soup cooks, stir together lemon zest, parsley, and garlic in a small bowl. Juice lemon in separate bowl.

Step 3: Stir turkey meat into soup and cook just until heated through. Add lemon juice and stir. Ladle into bowls and garnish with parsley, garlic, and lemon zest mixture (gremolata). Serve hot.



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